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Research data management

Funder requirements

There are various things you must do with your data depending on who is funding your research. 

If your research is not externally funded, you still need to comply with the University's Research Data Management Policy and deposit of copy of your research data and associated metadata to Manchester Metropolitan's research data repository.

Select your funder from the list below to learn more about their data requirements.

Funder policies

Data Management Plan

Mandatory for all Leadership Fellows proposals, Research Grants and Follow on Funding applications, but not required for Research Networking.

Sharing Policy

AHRC share the UKRI Common Principles on Data Policy

"Results should be made openly available with as few restrictions as possible in a timely and responsible manner." However, AHRC recognise that there are legal, ethical, and commercial constraints on releasing the data.

 

When do I make my data available?

There is no stipulation on when the data should be deposited.

 

How long should the data be available?

Any significant electronic resources or datasets created as a result of research must be made available in an accessible and appropriate depository for at least three years after the end of the grant.

 

Where do I deposit?

The choice of data repository is up to the grant holder.

 

Costs

Costs related to long term storage will be permitted providing these are fully justified and relate to the project. Full justification must be provided in Justification of Resources.

Data Management Plan

Mandatory for all applicants seeking grant funding.

Sharing Policy

"BBSRC recognises that plans for sharing data will vary according to the type of data collected. Data sharing should be driven by scientific benefit and should also be cost effective. Data should be shared using established standards and existing resources where this is possible."

 

When do I make my data available?

All data and accompanying metadata should be shared in a timely fashion as soon as it is verified. A timely release would generally be no later than the release through publication of the main findings or within three years of the creation of the dataset.

 

How long should the data be available?

"Researchers are expected to ensure that data are maintained for a period of 10 years after the completion of the research project."

 

Where do I deposit?

Researchers are encouraged to use existing infrastructure. Data should be deposited in the most appropriate database, repository, or via a third party services such as open access repositories.

 

Costs

Funding to support the management and sharing of research data (for example staffing, physical resources such as storage and networking capability) can be requested as part of the full economic cost of a research project.

Data Management Plan

It is mandatory for grant applicants to provide a data management and sharing plan as part of the application.

Sharing Policy

Cancer Research UK wishes to ensure that data arising from the research funded must be shared in a timely and responsible manner.

 

When do I make my data available?

"No later than the acceptance for publication of the main findings from the final dataset (unless restrictions from third party agreements or IP protection still apply) or on a timescale in line with the procedures of the relevant research area." Embargoes are permitted.

 

How long should the data be available?

Data should be retained for at least five years after the end of the grant.

 

Where do I deposit?

It is up to the grant holder to choose the repository for storing and sharing data, but Cancer Research UK recommends appropriate data repositories for discovery, clinical, and population research.

Costs

Costs can be budgeted in the application provided they are justified and reasonable in the context of the research. 

Data Management Plan

Not mandatory for grant application, but a DMP is expected to be created by grant holders.

Sharing policy

It is expected that data resulting from EPSRC funding should be shared. Metadata, including a doi, describing the research data must be published and made freely accessible on the internet. A statement on how to access the data must accompany published research papers. Non-digital data needs to be stored in a manner facilitating sharing in the event of a valid request for access.

 

When do I make the data available?

Metadata describing the research data must be published normally within 12 months of the data being generated.

 

How long should the data be available?

Research data must be "securely preserved for a minimum of 10 years from the date that any researcher ‘privileged access’ period expires or, if others have accessed the data, from the last date on which access to the data was requested by a third party."

 

Where do I deposit?

The grant holder can choose where to deposit data, but the data must have a doi linking publications with any underpinning data.

 

Costs

"All costs associated with research data management are eligible expenditure of research grant funds" so long as no expenditure is double funded and all directly incurred expenditure of a grant is incurred before the end date of the grant.

Data Management Plan

Mandatory for all ESRC applicants planning to generate data from their research.

Sharing Policy

Grant holders are expected to generate data for further re-use.

 

When do I make the data available?

"Researchers should ensure that when they publish research findings, the data that support these findings are deposited at the same time with a responsible digital repository." All data created or repurposed during the lifetime of the grant must be made available for re-use or archiving within three months of the end of the grant.

An embargo period, no longer than 12 months from the end of the grant, can be applied to allow grant holders to publish their research findings.

 

How long should the data be available?

There is no stipulation on how long data must be retained.

 

Where do I deposit?

The ESRC funds the UK Data Service, but the grant holder can choose another appropriate repository. A metadata record must be provided to the UK Data Service.

 

Costs

Grant holders can cost activities related to the preparation of data for curation. However, because the ESRC funds national service providers in order to guarantee long-term preservation of all research data deposited by grant holders, costs for long-term preservation can not be included in grant proposals.

Data Management Plan

All applicants are required to include a Data Management Plan as a part of the application.

Sharing Policy

"MRC expects valuable data arising from MRC-funded research to be made available to the scientific community with as few restrictions as possible so as to maximise the value of the data for research and for eventual patient and public benefit."

 
When do I make the data available?

The data should be shared in a timely and responsible manner, but MRC recognises there may be occasions for embargoing the data, such as for filing patent applications. "For medical research involving personal data, the appropriate regulatory permissions - ethical, legal and institutional - must be in place before the data can be shared."

 

How long should the data be available?

There is no stipulation on how long data should be available.

 

Where do I deposit?

There is no stipulation on where to deposit data.

 

Costs

Costs for managing and sharing substantial data collections can be included in the application.

Data Management Plan

An Outline Data Mangement Plan is mandatory for all applicants. It must identify data sets of long-term value that should be made available in NERC data centres for archiving and re-use.

Grant holders must produce a Full Data Management Plan within three to six months of the start of the data of the grant.

Sharing Policy

It is NERCs policy to "ensure the continuing availability of environmental data of long-term value for research, teaching, and for wider exploitation for the public good, by individuals, government, business and other organisations." A statement on how the data and any other relevant research materials can be accessed must be included on publications.

 

When do I make the data available?

NERC allows grant holders who undertake NERC-funded work a maximum period of two years from the end of the data collection to work exclusively on and publish the results of the data they have collected.

 

How long should the data be available?

There is no stipulation for how long data should be available, but it is expected that data of long-term value be deposited in a NERC centre repository.

 

Where do I deposit?

"NERC requires that all environmental data of long-term value generated through NERC-funded activities must be submitted to [a NERC Data Centre] for long-term management and dissemination." All environmental data made available will be accompanied by a data license.

Costs

Applications must identify all resources needed for data management.

All data held by the NERC Environmental Data Centres will be supplied for free except for large or complex requests.

Data Management Plan

Proposals for grant funding should include a Data Management Plan. DMPs should also exist for all data within the scope of the policy.

Sharing Policy

STFC expects that data is made publicly available to anyone.

 

When do I make the data available?

“Data resulting from publicly funded research should be made publicly available after a limited period, unless there are specific reasons (e.g.  legislation, ethical, privacy and security) why this should not happen. The length of any proprietary period should be specified in the data management plan and justified, for example, by the reasonable needs of the research team to have a first opportunity to exploit the results of their research, including any IP arising.”

"‘Published’ data should generally be made available within six months of the date of the relevant publication."

 

How long should the data be available?

Data should be preserved for as long a period as possible. Original data should be retained for a minimum of ten years after the end of the project. For data that cannot be re-measured, effort should be made to retain them "in perpetuity".

 

Where do I deposit?

"STFC would normally expect data to be managed through an institutional repository, e.g. as operated by a research organisation, a university, a laboratory or an independently managed subject database." The repository should be appropriate for the data and maximise its scientific value.

 

Costs

STFC does not directly address costs apart from referring to the UKRI Common Principle that it is appropriate to use public funds to manage publicly-funded data. STFC does distinguish between the cost of data curation and the long-term value of that data.

Data Management Plan

Called Outputs Management Plan. All applicants need to consider the management of the research data, and an Outputs Management Plan is mandatory for applicants whose proposed research is "likely to create significant research outputs that are of value to other researchers and users".

Sharing Policy

It is expected that researchers "maximise the value of their research outputs, including data, software and materials" with as few restrictions as possible. Wellcome recognise that there are circumstances where controls and limits on sharing are necessary such as privacy and developing intellectual properties.

 

When do I make the data available?

"As a minimum, the data underpinning research papers should be made available to other researchers at the time of publication, as well as any original software that is required to view datasets or to replicate analyses. Where research data relates to public health emergencies, researchers must share quality-assured interim and final data as rapidly and widely as possible, and in advance of journal publication."

 

How long should the data be available?

There is no stipulation on how long the data should be made available, but it should have a persistent identifier wherever possible.

 

Where do I deposit?

Research should be deposited in a "recognised community repositories for data and other outputs where these exist". Wellcome also hosts the Wellcome Open Research repository for Wellcome-funded researchers who wish to rapidly publish results worth sharing.

Costs

Wellcome will "fund any justified costs for delivering the plan as part of funding the research".

Data Management Plan

“A DMP is required for all projects participating in the extended ORD [Open Research Data] pilot, unless they opt out of the ORD pilot. However, projects that opt out are still encouraged to submit a DMP on a voluntary basis.”

When funding has been approved, the DMP must be submitted within the first 6 months of the project. Updates need to be made over the course of the project whenever significant changes occur, and it should be updated with the periodic evaluation and assessment of the project.

Sharing Policy

The European Commission follow the principle that data should be made "as open as possible, as closed as necessary". There is an emphasis on data that is made FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable).

 

When do I make the data available?

"Research data should be made available as soon as possible." Embargoes are permitted to give time to publish or seek patents. It should be specified why the embargo is set and for how long it will apply. 

 

How long should the data be available?

There is no stipulation on how long data should be made available, but it is expected that data of value will remain re-useable. The length of time data will be available should be identified.

 

Where do I deposit?

Data should be deposited in the most appropriate research data repository. These may be subject-based, thematic, institutional, or centralised. The European Commission suggests the Registry of Research Data Repositories to help identify a suitable repository. Additionally,  The Open Access Infrastructure in Europe (OpenAIRE) and CERN maintain the repository Zenodo to provide additional support for researchers to deposit and link publications to underlying data with persistent identifiers.

Costs

“Costs related to open access to research data in Horizon 2020 are eligible for reimbursement during the duration of the project under the conditions defined in the H2020 Grant Agreement, in particular Article 6 and Article 6.2.D.3, but also other articles relevant for the cost category chosen.”

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